Twilight walk provides grower update on weeds and soil health

EVENING MEETING: Jason Emms from the GRDC, Professor Leslie Weston and PhD student James Mwendwa at the twilight walk.
EVENING MEETING: Jason Emms from the GRDC, Professor Leslie Weston and PhD student James Mwendwa at the twilight walk.

It was an evening stroll with a practical purpose.

The Graham Centre for Agricultural Innovation held an twilight crop and weed walk to update producers about five-year mixed farming rotations to suppress weeds using crop selection and grazing management.

It was also a chance for farmers affected by the drought to meet up with others.

According to organisers, Leslie Weston and Bill Brown from Charles Sturt University’s school of agricultural and wine sciences, it was an opportunity for producers to hear about research that can improve their sustainability and profitability.

“Weeds compete with crops for moisture and nutrients, they can be costly to control and as more herbicide resistant weed populations develop it’s important to consider integrated management strategies,” Professor Weston said.

Researchers also presented findings about annual pasture legumes.

Dr Brown said research into the genetic traits that make some varieties of wheat better at out-competing the weeds was on the agenda, along with intercropping as a tool for weed control and increasing the health of soils.

LATEST INFORMATION: Vince West from CSU and Chris Lane of Galore at the twilight weed walk.

LATEST INFORMATION: Vince West from CSU and Chris Lane of Galore at the twilight weed walk.