Chainsaw carving turns a yellow box log into a 'crocodile'

SPORT AND CREATIVITY: Chainsaw carving specialist, Justin McClelland, rider Zac Bryce and agistment princnipal, Malcolm Edgar all of Wagga. Picture: Nikki Reynolds
SPORT AND CREATIVITY: Chainsaw carving specialist, Justin McClelland, rider Zac Bryce and agistment princnipal, Malcolm Edgar all of Wagga. Picture: Nikki Reynolds

A SPECTACULAR crocodile has been carved from a yellow box log on a rural property near Wagga.

The crocodile, which can be viewed from the road near Gregadoo, has also become a popular jump for eventing enthusiasts. 

It was a project which came about with input from Malcolm Edgar, who runs the Arundel Park Agistment Farm, and Justin McClelland of Timba Tumba Carving, Wagga. 

Mr McClelland is a regular face at the Henty Machinery Field Days (HMFD) where he demonstrates his skills in using a chainsaw to carve out clever creations. 

Mr Edgar explained that storms during previous months meant that some trees in the region had fallen down.

He said the large yellow box, which was pushed using a dozer to the new location, certainly lent itself to a project. 

Mr Edgar said he thought the log was worth something more than firewood.

He also was hoping some of the young eventers in the area would use it as a cross country jump. 

Mr McClelland explained that his first glance of the log didn’t immediately lend the project to ultimately becoming a crocodile. 

“I saw a lizard,” he said. 

Horse rider Zac Bryce has jumped the log several times on his gelding Cheeky. 

Mr McClelland uses several different sized chainsaws to help create his works of art.

And despite the intricacies on this crocodile he said the entire project was completed using a chainsaw.

Even the smaller work simply drew on the dimensions of a smaller saw. He estimated the yellow box tree used to create a crocodile carving near Gregadoo was 50 to 60 years old. 

Mr McClelland said chainsaw carving certainly wasn’t for the fainthearted but it was possible to come up with distinctive artworks that people can admire.

He was hoping, the fact the crocodile was located near the road, that motorists might slow down and have a look at the work. Or if they are lucky they might catch a glimpse of someone jumping it. 

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