Federal election 2019: Riverina guide to where to vote, who are the candidates

Not sure how to navigate the 2019 federal election day, and what to expect when you get to the voting centre?

Don't worry, we've got you covered.

From whos running, where to vote, and everything in between, heres what you need to know about election day in Wagga and the wider Riverina electorate.

Do I have to vote?

Yes, it is compulsory for all eligible Australian citizens to enrol and vote in elections.

Maps: Australian Electoral Commission

Maps: Australian Electoral Commission

So you're required to vote for the next Riverina MP if you live in the area bounded by Parkes, Cowra, Harden and Gundagai in the east to Ungarie, Ardlethan and Coolamon in the west and from Tullamore, Peak Hill and Parkes in the north to Lockhart, Tarcutta and Gundagai in the south.

If you have voted at a pre-poll location or submitted a postal vote, you do not need to vote again.

Where can I vote?

Voting centres open at 8am on Saturday and close at 6pm.

You don't have to vote at the closest polling place to home. More information on locations and how to get there can be found here.

Who can I vote for?

Heres who you have to choose from on the voting form.

CANDIDATES: Michael McCormack (Nationals), Michael Bayles (Greens), Mark Jeffreson (Labor) and Richard Foley (United Australia Party).

CANDIDATES: Michael McCormack (Nationals), Michael Bayles (Greens), Mark Jeffreson (Labor) and Richard Foley (United Australia Party).

The Daily Advertiser's Jody Lindbeck sat down with each of the candidates and asked the political hopefuls to share a bit about themselves and their vision for the electorate. We've got a snapshot here, or click on each candidate's name below for the full Q&A.

The candidates are, in ballot order:

How do I vote?

On election day, you will be given two ballot papers to fill out - a green one for the House of Representatives, and a white one for the Senate. You must fill out both.

When filling out the small ballot, choose your preferred candidate, the Australian Electoral Commission advises. Find their name on the ballot and write a 1 in the box next to that person's name. Then continue writing numbers 2 through 4 against candidates, in your preferred order.

You must number every box for your vote to count.

On the large white form, you can vote above or below the line, but not both.

Sample ballot papers outlining how to vote for (clockwise from left) the House of Representatives, above the line for the Senate and below the line for the Senate. Pictures: Australian Electoral Commission

Sample ballot papers outlining how to vote for (clockwise from left) the House of Representatives, above the line for the Senate and below the line for the Senate. Pictures: Australian Electoral Commission

Here's how the AEC explains it.

"(To vote above the line) Put the number '1' in the box for the party or group that is your first choice, a '2' for your second choice and so on until you've numbered at least six boxes," the commission outlines.

"You can continue to place numbers in the order of your choice in as many boxes above the line as you like."

And for below the line? You must choose at least 12 candidates for your vote to count.

When will we know a result?

The count begins after voting closes at centres and online at 6pm on election day.

What happens if I don’t vote?

The penalty for failing to vote at a federal election is $20. If you appear to have failed to vote, you will be issued a penalty notice that gives the following options.

  • provide a claim that you voted and details of where you voted
  • give a valid and sufficient reason in writing for not voting
  • pay the penalty
  • apply to have the matter heard in court (the maximum penalty that a court may impose for an offence of failing to vote is $110 plus court costs).
This story Election day in the Riverina: everything you need to know first appeared on The Daily Advertiser.