High prices show optimism in seedstock sector

DEMAND: Elders studstock representative Jenni O'Sullivan, Albury, with Roger and Jock Harbison, Dunoon, and auctioneer Lincoln McKinlay (second from right). Picture: Brett Tindal
DEMAND: Elders studstock representative Jenni O'Sullivan, Albury, with Roger and Jock Harbison, Dunoon, and auctioneer Lincoln McKinlay (second from right). Picture: Brett Tindal

A THRIVING studstock industry has those in the business buzzing with enthusiasm about the run of spring sales.

On Friday a Holbrook-based Angus stud earned a slice of the limelight after a bull made a whopping high of $140,000 with Elders studstock specialist Lincoln McKinlay at the rostrum taking the bids.

The sale came as a thrill for vendors the Harbison family of Dunoon Angus.

Mr McKinlay of Inverell said great breeding programs were certainly being rewarded.

A combination of high indicator prices being seen at the weekly markets and good seasonal conditions throughout much of southern NSW have helped to instill optimism among purchasers, who look to the stud industry to secure bulls.

Those in the industry anticipate more highs as the spring selling season kicks into gear with on-property sales taking off as purchases seek out the best seed stock genetics.

The Holbrook result comes just weeks after the Mayne family of Texas Angus sold a bull for $108,000.

It was a high for the Texas Stud of Warialda in northern NSW. This stud had previously sold bulls to a high of $56,000

Mr McKinlay said the $140,000 result on Friday was the most he had ever sold a bull for. His previous high was $90,000 for a Brahman sire.

"I have had a long association with the Dunoon program in my career," Mr McKinlay said. "It is special when you get to see a bull of that calibre," he said.

Mr McKinlay has been selling livestock for seven years and said now was an exciting time to be in the industry.

"It is really positive and people with good quality cattle and good programs are being rewarded," he said.

"There is no better industry to be in ... I am so blessed and I love our stud stock industry here in Australia, I wouldn't do anything else, I love going to work everyday," Mr McKinlay said.

Australians are not the only ones enjoying the high prices.

Heading overseas to the sheep meat industry a world record price was set after a Texel commanded $665,175 in Scotland.

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