Studs get 'social' and it pays off

"A FAST sale is a good sale ... don't hang and drag."

We haven't heard the "hang and drag" phrase too much at the run of stud stock sales this spring.

MEET THE MARKET: Mark Boileau, Bannister Station manager, Crookwell, with Sam Lucas, Reiland Angus, and the $31,000 top-priced bull, Reiland Q-Stratisphere Q16. Photo: Kim Woods
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MEET THE MARKET: Mark Boileau, Bannister Station manager, Crookwell, with Sam Lucas, Reiland Angus, and the $31,000 top-priced bull, Reiland Q-Stratisphere Q16. Photo: Kim Woods --

Last week Millah Murrah Angus Stud achieved a whopping record average price of $20,384 which is recognised by the breed society as a new benchmark.

The average came just after fellow Angus stud, Dunoon, sold a bull for $140,000 at Holbrook.

And while we are on the subject of lofty numbers Kerin Poll offered a catalogue of 500 rams to break any past records.

But what about coronavirus?

It's there. It's having an impact, and wool and barley are feeling the brunt. But the appetite for protein and landholder will to purchase top-quality genetics couldn't be more evident.

We could say stud breeders have always been clever at adapting to the times. This industry knows how to roll out the "virtual red carpet" and put on a show to draw in the buyers.

Combine this with online selling platforms, the might of social media, video coverage and the good old telephone, and this industry has proven its ability to navigate COVID-19 pandemic restrictions in an admirable way.

Backed up by decent seasonal conditions in many parts of the state, the additional grass gives buyers more confidence to buy. And the stock offered look a treat.

Sure, you can jump in your car and enjoy the lifestyle of a "petrol cowboy" but the options to purchase online are getting better and better.

The element of trust between vendor, buyer and livestock agent is imperative. Relationships matter. And data such as Estimated Breeding Values (EBVs) are coming to the fore in a time when they are most needed.

In this region, every stud sale has been a good one. Vendors are telling us that their averages are up and despite what we are hearing about low flock and herd numbers, the impetus to buy a good sire is still there.

The Lucas family of Reiland Angus Stud were able to capitalise on a buoyant spring and managed to set a new on-property stud record with bulls selling to a high of $31,000. This eclipsed the previous record of $28,000 reached in autumn this year.

It wasn't just the top price which was prominent. The stud achieved an average of $10,395, a rise of $4192 on last year's spring sale result.

With more sales on the calendar the sky is the limit.

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